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myco domesticus (Mycophil)
Senior Member
Username: Mycophil

Post Number: 792
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Friday, February 13, 2004 - 12:09 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

this quote comes from a wineseller in israel , it is about wine made from MANDRAKE FRUIT , so no other part of the plants are used cause they are highly poisonous...
"Many are the legends and tales of the mandrake and its magical powers. In biblical times it was said to enable a childless woman to conceive (Genesis 30.14) and its powers as an aphrodisiac were legendary.
The mandrake was famous fot its heady aroma (Song of Songs 7.14). It was also used to cure for snake bite, wasp stings andomach aches, and to drive away evil spirits'of one kind and another.

Now the magical mandrake has been captured for the first time in history in the unusual, delicious liqueur made from 100% natural mandrake fruit by Mr. Micha Linn from Kibutz Mishmar Haemek-Israel."
In Richters' catalog of seeds it was mentioned that israelis are mad about it as an aphrodisiac ,so i googled and the wine popped up ,not a plant to use for the uninformed ! Poisonous like datura and co ,hyoscyamine and scopolamine ,so please watch it !!!


In an Age of Universal Deceit, Telling the Truth is a Revolutionary Act.

- George Orwell
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Hippie3 (Admin)
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 13861
Registered: 02-2001
Posted on Saturday, February 21, 2004 - 01:32 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

got that link, perchance ?
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Natura (Natura)
Senior Member
Username: Natura

Post Number: 309
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Saturday, February 21, 2004 - 11:03 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Let's bottom up ! & tchek my site article: on 23rd OCTOBER 2003

http://releasethereality.com/web/october03/23.html

P.S. I didn't try yet, but heard taste good nd smooth.
also tchek islaerieee one :
http://www.israelwines.co.il/Wineries/Winery.asp?A reaID=-1&WineryID=41
N+
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Hippie3 (Admin)
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 13874
Registered: 02-2001
Posted on Saturday, February 21, 2004 - 01:31 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Upload
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Blood (Blodwen_1)
Senior Member
Username: Blodwen_1

Post Number: 261
Registered: 06-2003
Posted on Saturday, February 21, 2004 - 04:15 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

basic grow info.
http://www.plantoftheweek.org/week080.shtml

How to grow: I have had good luck germinating these seeds by soaking them in cold water in the fridge for two weeks. Replace the water with new *cold* water daily to wash away the anti-germination chemicals that leach from the seed. I use an old vitamin bottle for this. At the end of two weeks, plant in Jiffy-7 pellets with kelp solution, as described in general growing tips. Don't plant any seeds that are floating after 24 hours; throw them out. Another method is to plant them as usual in a Jiffy-7 soaked in kelp solution and then put the Jiffy-7s seeds and all in the fridge for 4-6 weeks, covered lightly with the kind of plastic bag groceries come in. The fridge should be on the cold side, 41 F, or put them in the bottom toward the back. Then take them out to germinate. The idea is to imitate snowmelt. I have gotten them to germinate both ways, but the cold water method uses less fridge room. A third method is to plant them outside in the fall; I will be trying this method this year.

They are slow to come up, but they will. Make sure they stay moist but not sopping and do not put them in direct sunlight. They do not come up all at once, like the seeds of bedding plants do. These are seeds of wild plants, so their germination is staggered. Plant in partial shade in rich soil. Add peat to the soil to make it more acidic. If planting in a pot, make your own potting soil from 2 parts peat, 2 parts sand, and 1 part loam. Although the babies really seek out the sun, keep the plants in light shade (perhaps morning sun & afternoon shade, or just dappled shade). Fertilize regularly. A foliar spray of a solution of liquid kelp and fish meal is good, and a fertilizer for roots really makes a huge difference (I tried Rootone this year). They don't like being wet, but they will become dormant if they don't get enough water. Check the undersides of the leaves for aphids regularly, and use Safer Insecticidal Soap to get rid of them if they turn up. I have noticed that if you let a wet mandrake leaf touch the soil, it will generally get sick and fall off, so be careful when you water them to water the soil, not the plant.

Once you get a mandrake going, you can propagate it by dividing its tubers in the late autumn. It's winter hardy only in zones 8-11, the Deep South and the Northwest. Farther north, try growing on the south side of the house against the wall and either put them in a cold frame in the winter or keep them in a pot and take them into the garage or basement for the winter (don't water while the plant is dormant). For a pot, use one of the long kind usually sold as rose pots or plant several together in a large pot, so that they have plenty of room to grow down. The root can get over four feet long.

The plant seems to sense when the root is getting near the bottom of the pot and quits growing; the leaves become weak and fall off. I had some in a very large pot, but they still stopped growing at a certain point. When I dug them up, I found that the end of the root was an extremely long thread that had obviously hit the bottom. Cramped roots become spirals. Planting in lengths of sewer pipes or garbage cans with holes in the bottom might be a way to remedy this. Planting in the ground is better if you have good soil, but it is very difficult to dig up the root without breaking it. Even turning the soil out of a pot all in one piece and gently pushing away the dirt resulted in a broken root or two. The plant probably uses this brittle root strategy to propagate itself, since pieces of root will make a new plant. One possibility is to dig a good deep hole for your plant and fill it with a fine soil mix that will make digging up easier. Then water very heavily just before you dig up the root. This will allow it to come free more easily. I have done this with other plants and will try it with mandrake next season.

After one season of growth, you get a nice root about finger-length, a good size for work. Not all roots are forked, but most are. You can keep them fresh in the fridge wrapped in a slightly dampened paper towel inside an open baggie. Or you can put them in a jar of alcohol to preserve them, or dry them in a dehydrator. Don't put them in the microwave to dry, like you can with flowers; they will get ruined. They lose a substantial amount of weight and volume being dried. To get fruits, the plant has to be able to go through the winter without going dormant, a tough call in the US--perhaps in the Pacific Northwest. Without flowers, you won't get fruits. If you do get fruits, let them ripen fully before harvesting to get the best seeds.

You can also cut the roots and plant them to make more plants for the following year. In fall, cut the root into 1-2 inch long pieces. On each piece, cut the upward part straight across, and cut the lower part on an angle. Dip in rooting hormone and plant in soil in a sheltered spot or in a pot. Cover with sand. These will grow into new plants the following spring.

-Info from alchemy works

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Hippie3 (Admin)
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 13897
Registered: 02-2001
Posted on Saturday, February 21, 2004 - 04:18 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

archive material
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myco domesticus (Mycophil)
Senior Member
Username: Mycophil

Post Number: 826
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Sunday, February 22, 2004 - 12:41 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hip ,this is what catched my attention in the catalog of richters ,the canadian herb company:

Upload
In an Age of Universal Deceit, Telling the Truth is a Revolutionary Act.

- George Orwell
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Hippie3 (Admin)
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 13968
Registered: 02-2001
Posted on Sunday, February 22, 2004 - 01:08 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

sex eh ?
hmmm....

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