Grafting "Secrets" Return To Archives | Search

Please Visit Our New Forums at Mycotopia
Please visit our Sponsors

Mycotopia Web Archive Archive Botanicals Grafting "Secrets" Previous Next

ClosedClosed: New threads not accepted on this page
Topic Author Last Poster Posts Pages Last Post
"Una's" Cactus seedling graftingJoe Millionaireharry m stevens25 1 01-31-04  06:03 pm
Problems grafting LophophoraJackpotMonkey Hippie3 23 1 08-17-04  03:31 pm
grafting cacti onto PeireskiopsisHippie3 (Admin)Hippie3 2 1 08-26-04  12:39 pm
Lophophora graft progress Hidra Maverick 62 2 12-07-04  09:45 am

Top of pageBottom of pageLink to this message

Hippie3 (Admin)
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 10367
Registered: 02-2001
Posted on Tuesday, January 06, 2004 - 03:45 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)



Grafting "Secrets"

Grafting Young Seedlings Without Attachments
Use fully rooted Selenicereus grandiflorus cuttings with no active growing side shoots for grafting stock. Hylocereus species or Pereskiopsis species are good alternative grafting stocks that you can use with this method. Cacti seedlings are best grafted once they are large enough to safely handle, usually 2 to 3 weeks after germination. Young albino seedlings will often revert to their typical form after they are grafted. In order to achieve the most rapid development of your cacti seedlings, they should be grafted only at the first sign of areole nipples, feathery spines or fur type growth. Extremely slow growing seedlings (such as Aztekium or Strombocactus) may not be big enough to safely handle for grafting until 4 to 6 weeks after germination. When seedlings are grafted very young like this, they usually do not need any attachments to hold them onto the stock. However, the juice must not be too watery. This is because thicker viscous or gooey type sap will help hold the seedling in position while it bonds.

Cut the Selenicereus grandiflorus stock only a few inches tall. Center the cut scion seedling directly on the top of the stock. If the circular vascular ring of the stock is larger than the diameter of the seedling scion, then position the scion slightly off center of the stock so it is on top of an arch area of the circular vascular ring of the stock. Note that some seedlings will grow significantly faster than others, depending on how precisely the scion is positioned on top of the vascular ring tissue. You may wish to review the basic flat grafting instructions before starting. Remember to use the following numbered guidelines for optimum results, especially if using a grafting stock other that those just mentioned.

#1. The cut surface tissues of both the scion and stock must be young active growth.
#2. The stock plant must have thick (gooey) juices upon cutting, otherwise see #5 and #7 below.
#3. The stock plant must be a species which does not distort too quickly or too much upon drying.
#4. Both the scion and stock must have very clean flat cuts (this is absolutely essential!).
#5. Both the scion and stock must be turgid. Moderately water the scion and stock 5 days prior to grafting (use plain water only).
#6. The grafted plant must be placed inside a high humidity container for 10 days out of direct sunlight (this is absolutely essential!).
#7. If your grafting stock is not adequately juicy upon cutting you will probably need to used an attachment to hold the seedling scion against the stock. If either of your cuts are not perfectly flat (scion seedling or stock), you will also need to use an attachment AND let the stock plant bottom soak in room temperature water for only a few minutes immediately after grafting. Avoid bottom water soaking your stock plants after grafting unless absolutely necessary. Bottom watering will increase the risk of tissue rot on the graft and should only be done if the scion does not join flat and neatly to the stock. Remember to bottom water soak for no more than just a few minutes and only when this step is necessary as an emergency.

Caution: The grafting stock Pereskiopsis has been known to exude excess juice during periods of low or falling air pressure. This can cause the seedling scion to float off the center cut tip area of the grafting stock and cause the graft to fail. For this reason, avoid using the grafting stock Pereskiopsis unless the barometric air pressure is stable or rising.

Proper Humidity Gives Bests Results
Scions will fully bond with the stock in 72 hours (3 days) at room temperature, ideally inside an enclosed plastic storage box with a cup of water in the corner. Do not let the temperature drop below 65F during this 3 day period. At then end of this 3 day period, remove the attachments. However, grafted cacti should still be kept in the enclosed storage container for about 1 more week to control tissue shrinkage of the stock surface. Do not allow water droplets to land on the cut grafted area.

Warning: If the humidity is too high, remove the cup of water and the plastic lid for a few hours and then replace the lid. Ideally the humidity should be high enough to see a slight fog on the sides of the plastic container, but not so high that drops start to condense and run down the side of the plastic surface.

Avoid Bruising - Using a Sharp Blade!
Avoid bruising the tender seedlings while handling. If your razor blade does not slice easily, then use a new razor blade or experiment with a better cutting method. Avoid excessive pressure when attaching the scion to the stock.

Tubercle Grafting - Generating a New Shoot from the Areole
Tubercle grafting (sometimes called areole grafting) is the flat grafting of just one tubercle onto a fast growing stock. Flat grafting of just one tubercle can take 1 to 3 months for a new cactus shoot to develop. If you are trying to save a dying cactus, then flat grafting of a tubercle may be your best choice to save it since the tubercle is the last place that tissue rot usually occurs.

Place the flat cut tubercle on the stock, positioning the areole on the very top center of the grafting stock Selenicereus grandiflorus. You will have best results grafting close to the tip of the grafting stock. It is important that the tubercle is held firmly flat against the grafting stock for 5 to 10 seconds, usually with the dull back edge of the razor blade. Tubercle grafting is best done this way, without the use of attachments as long as you follow the same guidelines described in the above section entitled Grafting Young Seedlings Without Attachments. Be sure to remove any new side shoots that develop on the stock for best results. The Propagation of Cacti and Succulents web site has a brief discussion of this subject of tubercle grafting with an illustration of a cut areole, although I prefer to cut the tubercle more uniformly rather than mostly to one side as shown in their illustration.

You can also graft the single tubercle or a cluster of individual tubercles on a larger size stock vascular ring and hold them in place using the foam and masking tape attachment method. Just make sure the individual areoles are placed anywhere on the arch area of the circular vascular ring line. Remember to house your grafted cactus in an enclosed translucent plastic storage container for the first 10 days after grafting (to control the humidity) and remove any attachments 3 days after grafting.

Wedge Graft Variation - With healthy plants, I generally prefer to use the wedge graft method because it generates faster and more predictable results. The wedge graft method involves the grafting of a rib section which contains one or more areoles. With this method you cut off more of the original cactus tissue compared to an individual single flat grafted areole. With the wedge type of areole grafting, you can have a new shoot appear in only 3 weeks. However, it takes some practice to master so I usually recommend the flat graft of a one or more single areoles for beginners trying to save a dying plant. Remember to house your grafted cactus in an enclosed translucent plastic storage container for the first 10 days after grafting (to control the humidity) and remove any attachments 3 days after grafting.

Warning: Grafting of a single tubercle can sometimes introduce slight variations in the natural characteristics of the original plant because it is more directly influenced by the characteristics of the grafting stock. You may have seen comparisons of identical pups which are grafted on different types of grafting stock. Depending on the stock and scion combination, there can be slight variations when compared to the natural rooted pup. The same is true with grafting a single areole, although the flowers are still the same color! The more of the original tissue of the scion that is grafted, the less the amount of variation there will be in the new shoot that emerges from the tubercle. Because you start with more of the original plant tissue when you use the Wedge Graft method of grafting areoles, there will usually be less chance of form variations when compared to flat grafting of a single areole.

Upside Down Graft vs. Split Down the Middle Graft

Upside Down Graft: Upside down grafts are usually best performed on a round or squat shaped cactus (grafted scion, seedling or pup) which does not have elongated tubercles. For Ariocarpus and other round or squat shaped cacti with elongated tubercles, use the Split Down the Middle Graft described further below. Make sure that the cactus or pup is at least the size of a round glass marble (preferably slightly larger). To perform the upside down graft on a cactus pup, carefully cut it off its mother plant (using a strip leather or piece of dense foam to hold it) as close to the base as possible. If using a seedling, make sure the tip of the root is removed and the surface briefly rinsed with water to remove any dirt from the cactus. Lightly spray the cactus (grafted scion, seedling or pup) with a fine mist of 50% isopropyl alcohol. Allow the cactus to dry before making the cut, but quickly blot off the excess alcohol on sensitive plants using a clean paper tissue. If you have heavy amounts of spines, you may have to use a heavier mist spray or avoid cutting through the spine base area. Use a sterile sharp blade for cutting. If you are starting with a grafted scion, leave it attached to the stock plant while the the spray evaporates, before removing (cutting) it from the stock.

If the cactus has large spines, then place it on a thick piece of dense foam padding just before cutting (otherwise slice on the surface of a clean paper plate). Cut the cactus in half horizontally, dividing it equally into two halves. Then you flat graft the top half normally onto a Trichocereus grafting stock and flat graft the lower half upside down onto its own grafting stock. You will have best results if you use a Trichocereus grafting stock which has a larger diameter vascular ring than your scion cactus. I prefer to cut off the top 2 cm (3/4 inch) of the grafting stock, measured down from the inside center tip of the stock. This is usually the best area of the stock plant to use for grafting. The grafted top half scion will grow into a nice single specimen plant very quickly. The upside down grafted bottom half scion will usually send out one or more new shoots within a few weeks, which can be detached as pups to grow on their own roots. The pups can also be individually grafted onto a 3 to 4 inch tall Trichocereus stock for more rapid growth.

Split Down the Middle Graft: Split down the middle grafts are usually best performed on a round/squat shaped cactus which has elongated tubercles or on any type of torch shaped cactus. You can use a grafted scion, seedling or pup. The split down the middle graft is actually a type of micro grafting, which is photo illustrated in Cactus Grafting Newsletter #1 with a follow up article in Cactus Grafting Newsletter #2. To perform the graft using a cactus pup, carefully cut it off near the point of attachment. If using a seedling, make sure the tip of the root is removed and the surface briefly rinsed with water to remove any dirt from the cactus. Lightly spray the cactus (grafted scion, seedling or pup) with a fine mist of 50% isopropyl alcohol. Allow the cactus to dry before making the cut, but quickly blot off the excess alcohol on sensitive plants using a clean plain white unscented paper tissue. If you have heavy amounts of spines, you may have to use a heavier mist spray or avoid cutting through the spine base area. Use a sterile sharp blade for cutting. If you are starting with a grafted scion, leave it attached to the stock plant while the spray evaporates, before removing (cutting) it from the stock.

If the cactus has large spines, then place it on a thick piece of dense foam padding just before cutting (otherwise slice on the surface of a clean paper plate). With a torch shaped cactus, the tip of the cactus is first removed and that removed tip section is flat grafted normally onto a Trichocereus grafting stock. With a round/squat shaped cactus which has elongated tubercles, do not cut off the tip of the cactus. Now you are ready for the next step.

Slice the above prepared cactus lengthwise (vertically down the middle of the stem) to produce two halves. If done on a seedling, cut off any remaining root tip first before slicing it down the middle. Then flat graft these "split down the middle" pieces, making sure that the fresh cut surface is in contact with the stock plant's vascular ring. You will have best results if you use a Trichocereus grafting stock which has a larger diameter vascular ring than your scion cactus. I prefer to cut off the top 2 cm (3/4 inch) of the grafting stock, measured down from the inside center tip of the stock. This is usually the best area of the stock plant to use for grafting. If the split down the middle cut pieces are small enough, then they can both fit side by side on the top center of the same Trichocereus grafting stock. Otherwise, you should graft each half onto the center of its own stock. When done properly, new pups will develop from the exposed areoles of the grafted sections within a few weeks. Once the new pups are marble size or slightly larger, cut them off near the base to root on their own. The pups can also be individually grafted onto a 3 to 4 inch tall Trichocereus stock for more rapid growth.

Comparison Note: The split down the middle graft is actually a variation of micro grafting (grafting small sections containing multiple areoles) and is usually more effective for producing larger numbers of new shoots (pups) than flat grafting the bottom scion section upside down. This is because each of the split down the middle scion halves is in contact with more vascular tissue from the stock plant.

Micro Grafting - Expanded Information
Micro Grafting is the grafting of one or more small sections of a cactus in which each section contains two or more areoles. These sections are usually flat or wedge grafted onto a large diameter grafting stock, although a single scion section can be grafted individually onto a smaller size stock. Almost any larger fast growing stock which exhibits low distortion shrinkage after grafting will work for micro grafting. A stock with lots of gooey juice upon cutting is desirable as well. With multiple pieces to graft at a time, you will need to have a staging area (see below). Otherwise, follow regular grafting techniques and make sure your cut cactus section is firmly attached to the stock. The use of sterile foam on masking tape is required for proper uniform downward pressure upon the scion.

The Staging Area: One of the things I use when grafting multiple scions or micro grafting sections of cut cactus tissue is a staging area to place the cut scion pieces until I am ready to move and attach all of them at once to the top of the grafting stock. I simply use a clean piece of plastic wrap stretched over the top of a drinking glass or quart size yogurt type container. If necessary a large rubber band can be used to hold the plastic wrap taunt. When you pull the plastic wrap out of the box, use the sterile underside which comes off the roll as your top working surface layer. Do not touch any of the plastic wrap surfaces that are stretched across the glass in order to keep them sterile. Now you can use this surface to place your cut scion pieces upon after cutting. Press down from the top of the scion or scion piece section gently to remove air bubbles and leave on the plastic wrap for up to 5 or 10 minutes if necessary while preparing the stock surface.

If your cactus is ball shaped or has a rounded top, then you can also consider "wedge micro grafting". This method is easier to understand if you refer to Image #1 and Image #2 (print them out for convenience if you wish). In Image #1 you will notice that a ball shaped cactus (this could also work on a torch shaped cactus) is first cut in half horizontally as shown in Figure A. Then the top cut section is left in contact with the bottom half section while you proceed to cut the top section into 4 , 6 or 8 wedge shaped pieces. I have illustrated 8 pieces, but I would suggest you try just 4 wedge shaped pieces initially until you learn this technique. Figure B illustrates a top view of these cut pieces. The red colored area indicates the vascular ring tissue area of the cut wedge section (slightly exaggerated for purposes of illustration).

The wedges are placed on a sterilized surface and cut as shown in Figure C in Image #1. This renders the sharp angle of the wedge into a flattened section which is then attached to the grafting stock on top of the vascular ring area. Figure D shows a tightly grouped cluster of 8 of these cut pieces on top of a large diameter grafting stock while Figure E shows a more simple arrangement of only 4 pieces on top of a large diameter grafting stock. The vascular ring of the grafting stock is indicated by the red colored area. It is important to note that this method will only be successful if the vascular tissue areas of the wedge cut pieces and the vascular tissue of the grafting stock overlap (touch) each other. Another arrangement of the scion pieces that has a high degree of success is illustrated in Figure F in Image #2. I always use the sterile foam on masking tape method for attachment or whatever will ensure that the scion pieces remain flatly attached to the stock for 3 days at room temperature.

Warning about Stuck Spines: This is usually not a problem with softer type spines, but mainly a problem with hooked spines or longer hard spines. If you have spines that hook or grip the foam, then remove as much of the tape and foam that you can and leave the remaining foam/tape attached for 2 more weeks before attempting to remove from the stuck spines. That way the scions pieces will be more firmly bonded to the stock and the stuck foam can be more safely removed. One way to prevent longer spines from sticking to the foam is to cut the longer size spines with cuticle scissors (wear protective eye goggles if you do this).

Update Note: You may prefer to use just one of the wedge cut pieces per grafting stock, especially with smaller diameter size grafting stock. This will insure a much higher degree of success the first time you try it. With micro grafting, the pups are detached (once they are large enough) to grow on their own roots or individually grafted onto a 3 to 4 inch tall Trichocereus stock for more rapid growth.

The Wedge Graft (Cleft Grafting)
This is a difficult to cut grafting technique, which in not recommended for beginners. If you want an easier grafting technique, then I recommend first starting with the Split Down the Middle Graft. Scions should be at least marble size (preferably larger) before you slice them up, preferably one slice per rib. You will have best results if your grafting stock is a 3 to 4 inch tall Trichocereus species. The main benefit of this method is you will have a very fast growing new stem from each rib section that you graft. So if you have a 6 or 8 ribbed cactus pup, you will end up with 6 or 8 new growing cloned plants a few weeks after grafting.

Staging Area: One of the things I use when for grafting multiple scions or micro grafting sections of cut cactus tissue is a staging area to place the cut scion pieces until I am ready to move and attach all of them at once to the top of the grafting stock. I simple use a clean stretched piece of plastic wrap stretched over the top of a drinking glass or similar size container. If necessary a large rubber band can be used to hold it taunt, but this is usually not necessary if using a glass surface for it to cling upon. Just be very careful when you pull the plastic wrap out of the box to use the underside which comes off the roll as your top working surface layer since it will be sterile. Do not touch any of the plastic wrap surfaces that are stretched across the glass in order to keep them sterile. Now you can use this surface to place your cut scion pieces upon after cutting. Press down from the top of the scion or scion piece section gently to remove air bubbles and leave on the plastic wrap for up to 5 or 10 minutes if necessary while preparing the stock surface.

Preparation: Remove the sterilized pup or grafted scion near its base, cutting it horizontally just above the area of attachment. If starting with a large seedling, cut off the root end section.

Cut the cactus pup seedling or removed scion just like slicing pieces of thick pie, preferably one slice per cactus rib. However, for beginners you may wish to only cut the cactus into quarters (4 slices). Each wedge shaped "pie piece" is then individually grafted onto a Trichocereus stock. This is done by first cutting off just the tip of the stock plant horizontally to form a flat surface (smaller is better - don't cut down too deep into the stock when you remove the tip). The next part is tricky and comes with practice, so don't be discouraged the first time you try it.

Next make a wedge shaped V cut into the top of the stock to match the wedge shape of the "pie piece" scion and remove the cut out section from the stock. Then using tweezers and holding onto the spines of the cactus, move the "pie piece" scion into the wedge cut area. They should form a good size match to be successful. The sharp angle cut area of the scion needs to touch the bottom of the V cut notch in the stock to be successful!

Important Note Regarding Cutting: If the V cut in the stock is too narrow the graft will more likely fail than if the V cut in the stock is too wide. This is because the vascular ring tissue lies near the bottom and bottom sides of the V cut in the stock. The scion "pie slice" must make firm contact with the inside bottom of the V cut in the stock plant to succeed. Usually a small amount of downward pressure on the scion will push it into the bottom sides of the V cut of the stock plant. If the cut in the stock plant is too deep, you can slice off some more from the top horizontally. Be very careful to center the scion piece on the stock plant, making sure it is over the vascular tissue. Remember that best results will be achieved by fine tuning the V cut on the stock plant to match the scion section. Do not try to re-cut the scion section if possible. Instead you should re-cut the stock because the scion piece is more easily contaminated and sensitive to excessive handling.

Use your preferred method of attachment for holding the scion piece into place.

In only 2 weeks after grafting, one or more new cactus shoots will begin to appear on the grafted scion. New spines will appear first, just before the shoot fully develops. You will have best growth results if you remove any smaller shoots and allow just one shoot to grow from the grafted wedge shaped scion. Once you get the hang of this grafting method, you will be amazed at how quickly the new cactus shoot will grow. When it is large enough, the new cactus can be removed to root like a cutting and then grown on its own roots. Although tricky to learn at first, this wedge graft technique is probably the fastest way to grow multiple new cloned cacti from a single pup. If you prefer an easier method whereby the stock is cut flat instead of cutting a V shaped wedge in the stock, then check out the options listed in the Micro Grafting section further below.

Forced Pupping of a Grafted Scion
One way to force new shoots from a grafted scion is to re-graft it onto a much larger size Trichocereus type stock or other juicy columnar species with widely spaced spines. Make sure your stock is very healthy, well rooted and fast growing. Don't do this during winter unless you have a heated active type growing area. Keep grafted plants close to room temperature for at least the first 10 days after grafting. Taller types of Trichocereus lobivioides 'grandiflorus' hybrids with widely spaced spines are wonderful stock options to use for this purpose.

Alternative Method of Forced Pupping
This method works best on a fast growing grafted cactus, but can also be used on larger cacti which are not grafted. Carefully ream out the very top center tip of the cactus using a sterile round tip or round nose tip reamer bit (1/4 to 3/8 inch round tip reamer bits on a 3/8 inch shank work the best). This is done by holding the shank of the round tip reamer bit between your thumb and fingers. Then rotate it back and forth while applying a slight downward pressure at the very top center of the cactus. You could also use a clean wiped drill on low speed if no contaminants fall into the reamed out area. Ream only deep enough to reach the apical meristem, which is the part that you need to remove. You should see a very tiny dot or circle at the center of the cactus if you went deep enough (easier to see the following day after the cactus wound has healed). Remember to spray/wipe the reamer bit with an alcohol moistened rag and allow to dry before using. Round tip or round nose tip reamer bits are usually available at larger hardware or specialty tool stores in their drill bit section or router bit section.

Since you will have a miniature crater on the top of the cactus, avoid overhead watering and never allow water to accumulate on the top of the cactus. If water does accumulate, blot it off with a clean paper towel or tissue. Once the new pups start growing and are large enough, they can be rooted to grow on their own. Simply remove the new cactus pups as you would a cutting (once they get marble size or larger) to grow on their own roots. Once a pup is removed, other new pups will then start to grow from the remaining areoles. If you wish, smaller size pups can be individually grafted onto a 3 to 4 inch Trichocereus stock for more rapid growth instead of rooting on their own. Forced pupping is an easy practical way to grow many new cloned plants rapidly.


Grafting Tools
Clear Safety Glasses for Cutting Spiny Stocks or Scions
If either your stock or scion has lots of spines, you should take the precaution to use clear (wrap around type) safety glasses to prevent stray spines from landing in your eyes when you cut the plant. Also try to cut the plant at arm's length away and closer to waist level to avoid any spines from landing on you or your face or clothes. You will be surprised how far some spines can travel when you cut into a heavily spined cactus!

Spray Bottle and 50% Isopropyl Alcohol
To make 50% alcohol from 70% alcohol, add about 1/3 more water. Spray bottle mist application is one of the easiest and best ways to deal with sterilization Issues. You can spot spray a clean white unscented tissue with 50% isopropyl alcohol and then wipe the blade before making your cut (allow any slight alcohol residue to completely evaporate off the blade before cutting).

Disposable Latex Painters Gloves
These are usually sold 100 count per box and are found in paint type stores or some larger hobby stores. The hand section of the glove is cut (use very clean sharp scissors) into elastic band type loop pieces which are then cut to form a single elastic band strip. This elastic strip is usually attached to the sides of the pots using alligator clips (Radio Shack has a good selection of alligator clip sizes). The width of the strip can be cut thin or wide, depending on the size of the scion. They exert very uniform pressure upon the grafted scion and are especially useful when attaching delicate scions. Spray the cut strips with 50% isopropyl alcohol and allow to dry before using.

The center section of the elastic band that actually covers the scion can also be cut slightly thinner to form a fine thin elastic band area that only covers the scion area. This is useful for attaching scions with elongated tubercles by positioning the thin elastic band over the center of the scion, between the elongated tubercles.

Using Rubber Bands: Medium thickness rubber bands can also be cut into an elastic cord and used with the alligator clips in the above described manner, but this is usually not advised with smaller delicate scions. The latex elastic strips make from the latex gloves have a much longer range of stretch and elasticity, making them a safer choice to use with delicate scions. Latex elastic strips also exert a more uniform pressure upon the scion when compared to the rubber band strip.

Rubber Bands and Alligator Clips (see above section)

Foam Pieces or Strips
Scrap pieces of dense foam are used for holding spiny cacti to prevent your hands from injury. Open cell foam (you can breathe through it) is used for attaching the scion to the stock with a strip of masking tape (see the foam attachments section).

Razor Blades
Longer length razor blades up to 3" (7.5 cm) can be found in larger hobby stores and some hardware stores. I recommend blades which are smooth across the entire surface (no raised edges). Cutting Methods will vary and some prefer the thin flexible type blades used for shaving. Thin razor blades (like pointed hobby type artist blades) are best for cutting delicate scions while thicker type razor blades are better suited for cutting the stock plant tissues, depending on the thickness of the grafting stock.

Clean Plain White Unscented Tissue
When you need to sterilize your cutting knife of other surface, just mist spray a section of clean folded piece of plain white unscented paper tissue until slightly damp with 50% isopropyl alcohol. Use to wipe blade surfaces and allow excess to evaporate off the blade before using.

Tweezers
Clean sterile tweezers can be used for holding and maneuvering young scion seedlings. Just make sure that they don't have any sharp edges which can damage or bruise delicate scions. Larger size tong type tweezers can also be useful with some of the grafting options detailed on this page.

Paper Plates and Disposable Container with Lid
I use clean paper plates to hold and organize my grafting tools. Try to organize things and work in a clean counter area. You should also have some kind of rigid disposable container for the cut spined sections of removed plant material created during the grafting process (also good for old razor blades).

Large Clear Plastic Storage or Housing Container with Lid
This is used for housing grafts for up to 10 days in a moist enclosure to control the shrinkage of the cut cactus tissues after grafting. This can be used in a similar manner to house cuttings for about 10 days while they callous their cut surfaces.

Zipper Type Sandwich or Storage Bags
These are used to cover smaller grafted plants to control humidity. Sometimes, cutting the corners of the bag opening will allow them to slip over most 4 inch size plastic pots. To control the amount of humidity, the inverted corners of the plastic bag can be cut at a 45 degree angle to create a small hole to allow excess humidity to escape.

Plant Preparation

Plants should be moderately watered 5 days prior to grafting or de-grafting so that the plants are turgid and plump. If you water your grafting stock and then try to graft before waiting 5 days, the juices from the stock will be too watery. Gooey type juices are more desirable, more rot resistant and also keep the cut tissues from dehydrated too quickly after grafting. Ideally, the stock should be watered and then the best time to graft would be when the soil is only moderately to just slightly moist.

All exterior plant surfaces (that will be cut) should be clean and dry prior to cutting. Spray the stock surfaces with a fine mist of 50% isopropyl alcohol and wait a few hours to completely dry. Scions can be sprayed and them lightly blotted with clean white tissue to remove the excess alcohol more quickly. If you have heavy amounts of spines, you may have to use a heavier mist spray or avoid cutting through the spine base area. Use a sterile sharp blade for cutting. It is very important that any treated surfaces be allowed to fully dry before cutting, in order to avoid chemical damage to the interior tissues. Any scions that have been in contact with the soil will also need to be sprayed and dried prior to surgery. Remember to make sure that alcohol wiped razor blades are also dry before slicing. Cutting with a blade that still has trace amounts of unevaporated alcohol is the most common grafting mistake.

Dealing with Spines

Some grafting methods are more difficult to perform if either the stock or the scion has long or stiff spines that interfere with the bonding of the cut surfaces. Sometimes longer spines will also complicate the manner in which the scion is attached to the stock. Don't hesitate to cut off any spines that might interfere with the grafting process. I use very sharp floral snippers to cut spines when necessary. It is highly recommended that you wear protective eye goggles if you cut or snip spines (best done over the garbage can to catch the flying spine pieces).

Warning about Stuck Spines: When using the foam with masking tape attachment method you can sometimes have spines that stick to the foam. This is usually not a problem with softer type spines, but mainly a problem with hooked spines or longer hard spines. One way to prevent longer spines from sticking to the foam is to cut the longer size spines with cuticle scissors (wear protective eye goggles if you do this). If you do end up with spines on the scion that hook or grip the foam, then remove as much of the tape and foam that you can and leave the remaining foam/tape attached for 2 more weeks before attempting to remove from the stuck spines. That way the scions pieces will be more firmly bonded to the stock and the stuck foam can be more safely removed.

WARNING!
I highly recommend the use of goggles or protective magnifier type goggles to protect your eyes against stray spines while cutting cacti! Be sure to clean up the work space area when done in case any spines have found their way onto the floor, counters or other areas where you don't want spines!

Try to have a good size assortment of clean dense foam strips or pieces within reach before you start grafting. You may end up needing them for spine protection, whether you think you do or not. Leather gloves are O.K. for transplanting or re-potting, but are probably too unsanitary to use for handling plants during grafting operations.

Cutting Method Details

Basic Flat Graft Instructions
Briefly mist spray all of the surfaces to be cut with 50% isopropyl alcohol, just barely enough to dampen the surfaces. Allow the cactus to dry before making the cut, but quickly blot off the excess alcohol on sensitive plants using a clean white unscented paper tissue. If you have heavy amounts of spines, you may have to use a heavier mist spray or avoid cutting through the spine base area. Use a sterile sharp blade for cutting. If the stock is narrow diameter, then cut through the stock horizontally deeply enough to fully expose the vascular ring tissues and remove the cut stock section. If the cut off top piece of the stock plant is large enough, you might be able to root it as you would a regular cactus cutting. After removing the cut off top section from the stock, cut another very thin slice, but leave in place until you are ready to attach the scion.

Note: If you have a large or thick diameter stock plus a small or low profile scion, then you will need to bevel cut the rib edges of the stock plant at a 45 degree angle before cutting the above mentioned thin slice. Refer to the Bevel Cutting Section further below for those cutting instructions. It is very important that the scion and stock tissues be cut as cleanly as possible. Razor blades or hobby type razor knife blades are well suited for the task. If the cut scion is really tiny, you can often move it to the stock plant by keeping the cut surface of the scion on the flat surface of the razor blade. Otherwise, use delicate tweezers or whatever method works best for moving the freshly cut scion to the surface of the stock plant.

Remove the thin pre-cut stock section and position the scion onto the stock surface. Make certain the scion is centered anywhere on the circular line that forms the vascular ring of the stock. Avoid bruising any of the scion surfaces while you position it. Once in position, gently press down on the scion for about 5 to 10 seconds to insure a good connection and squeeze out any air bubbles. Unless you are grafting very tiny young scions, areoles or tubercles onto a juicy stock plant surface, you will probably need a method of attachment to hold the scion in place. Refer to the Methods of Scion Attachment section for further details. Remember to house your grafted cactus in an enclosed translucent plastic storage container for the first 10 days after grafting (to control the humidity) and remove the attachments 3 days after grafting. Keep the grafted plants at room temperature during the first 3 days.

Cutting the Stock - (Basic Guide to Optimum Depth)
The optimum slicing depth for most types of grafting stock is usually about the depth of a round marble, down from the center of the top of cactus body. Then if necessary, cut off thin additional slices until you get a surface with ample flowing sap and well defined vascular tissue. Then with a separate sterile thin blade, cut the scion and immediately position it on the stock. For best results, your cuts should be very flat and smooth, otherwise try cutting another very thin slice off the scion or stock to get a smooth flat surface. Use a fresh sharp blade for optimum results.

Cutting the Seedling
Hold down the sterilize seedling by the root end of the seedling, on top of a clean paper plate. This will prevent bruising the upper portion which will be grafted. Then use a long thin razor to cut the seedling. Cutting the seedling takes a little practice and you may be able to come up with various methods for holding and cutting of the scion. Use whatever you can think of that works best for you. I use delicate plastic tweezers for cutting the smaller size seedlings, holding the tip of the tweezers against a clean paper plate while cutting to prevent movement. Another trick is to use a plastic drinking straw (first cut the straw in half lengthwise) to hold the scion.

Bevel Cutting the Stock Edges
With smaller or thinner diameter stock plants like Selenicereus grandiflorus, I usually do not bevel cut the edges unless there are spines in the way. As a general rule I try to avoid or minimize the amount of bevel cutting on the stock. This helps to minimize tissue shrinkage and increases the rebound speed of the grafted scion. Only cut the outermost sections of each rib at a very slight upward angle if you decide to bevel cut the edges of the stock. This will help to focus more uniform tension upon the scion when attached to the stock. With heavier spined stocks, it may be best to begin the bevel cut from the top of the plant and cut in a downward and/or sideways direction on the outermost section of each rib.

Remember to avoid overhead watering until the remaining exposed cut tissue has fully calloused. Remember to house your grafted cactus in an enclosed container of some sort for the first 10 days after grafting (to control the humidity), but remove the attachments 3 days after grafting at room temperature.

Method of Scion Attachment
Scion Placement Notes
Before attaching your scion, you need to know exactly where to place it on the stock plant. When making your flat graft cuts into the stock and scion, it is necessary to quickly identify the position of the vascular ring. The vascular ring is the darker O shaped marking that you see when looking at a cross cut section of a cactus. The size and/or width of the vascular ring will vary, depending on how deep the cut is made from the tip of the cacti.

The vascular ring of the scion and the vascular ring of the stock need to overlap (touch) each other at some point or the graft will usually fail. This is most commonly done by placing the scion slightly off center of the stock so that the vascular ring of both the scion and stock will overlap each other slightly. If possible try to place the scion over the stock plant's widest vascular ring area. This ring is sometimes more visible as a series of "dots" that form a circle. In that situation, at least one area of the vascular ring on the cut scion plant should be touching one of these "dots" when attached to the stock.

With an extremely small scion or tubercle, you need to center the entire vascular ring of the scion or tubercle directly on top of the stock plant's ring line (anywhere directly on top of the circular line or visible "dot"). If an area of the vascular ring is wider or has a larger size "dot", then place your extremely small scion directly on top of that area. The Closet Cactus Care web site by Michael S. Smith has a fine diagram to illustrate the vascular ring placement between scion and stock. Continue to the following sections for methods on how to attach your scions to the stock plant.

Elastic Strip and Alligator Clips
Disposable thin elastic type latex gloves are usually sold 100 count per box and are found in paint type stores or some larger hobby stores. The hand section of the glove is cut (use very clean sharp scissors) into elastic band type loop pieces which are then cut to form a single elastic band strip. This elastic strip is usually attached to the sides of the pots using alligator clips (Radio Shack has a good selection of alligator clip sizes). The width of the strip can be cut thin or wide, depending on the size of the scion. They exert very uniform pressure upon the grafted scion and are especially useful when attaching delicate scions. Spray the cut strips with 50% isopropyl alcohol and allow to dry before using.

The center section of the elastic band that actually covers the scion can also be cut slightly thinner to form a fine thin elastic band area that only covers the scion area. This is useful for attaching scions with elongated tubercles by positioning the thin elastic band over the center of the scion, between the elongated tubercles.

Warning! Be careful when you remove the elastic bands with scions that have a taller profile. The sideways release of tension can tear smaller size scions off the stock.

Rubber Band Strips and Alligator Clips
Medium thickness rubber bands can also be cut into an elastic strip and used with the alligator clips in the above described manner, but this is usually not advised with smaller delicate scions. The latex elastic strips made from the latex gloves have a much longer range of stretch and elasticity, making them a safer choice to use with delicate scions. Latex elastic strips also exert a more uniform pressure upon the scion when compared to the rubber band strip. Rubber bands are better suited for grafting marble size or larger scions.

Nylon Stocking Pieces
This method is usually just a small square cut piece of clean sheer nylon stocking which is stretched around the spines of the stock plant to keep the scion attached. As long as the grafting stock is large enough to wrap a small piece of the fabric around it and snag on the spines of the stock plant, this will work on most juicy Trichocereus species of grafting stock and also for smaller grafts on Selenicereus grandiflorus. The nylon fabric can be reused many times if first saturated with alcohol, squeezed out and then allowed to dry before using.

With a slightly larger scion that has hard or hooked spines, you should use tweezers to place a square size piece of sterile foam between the spines of the scion and the nylon stocking material. That will help to prevent the scion spines from snagging on the stretched nylon fabric.

Removing the fabric from the stock after grafting is usually not difficult unless it snags on the spines. If the fabric begins to snag on a spine or the scion, then cut the snagged thread or the fabric area with sharp scissors (or wait a couple more weeks to do this after the grafting bond is stronger).

Creme, ivory or off white colored nylon stockings are usually easier to see through. You need to have a very good quality pair of scissors to cut the fabric. If you are grafting very small or thin scions, you may need to bevel cut the edges of your stock to get the proper angle for downward tension on the scion. After the scion in attached with the nylon stocking material, you can increase the downward tension by adding a small clean piece of foam padding stuck on a piece of masking tape.

Soft Open Cell Foam Pads with Masking Tape
This method is not recommended for scions with elongated tubercles as it may damage some parts of the scion (use the elastic strip with alligator clips for grafting elongated tubercle type scions). However this method works really great for all other types of cactus (which is about 98% of everything that you will probably ever graft). This method utilizes clean soft open cell type foam, regular type masking tape (or sometimes safe release type masking tape) and 50% isopropyl alcohol. These are things that you probably already have or can acquire with little cost. Open cell foam padding is the type that you can blow or breathe through if you put it up to your mouth.

Warnings! Only use breathable open cell type foam or you may end up with cactus rot! If you cannot breathe through the foam, it will not work 100% of the time and may increase the risk of tissue rot of the cut surfaces. Do not breathe through the foam after it has been sterilized. It is very important that you wet the foam padding with 50 % alcohol, squeeze out the excess using a clean white unscented tissue. Then allow the remaining alcohol to evaporate out of the foam while resting on a clean plate in a clean dry area. I let mine dry overnight on a clean paper plate. If you get a strong discoloration upon squeezing out the alcohol, wet the foam again with more alcohol and squeeze out the excess. Some foam has binder type compounds which need to be removed to be absolutely sterile.

Prepare a larger size piece of open cell foam as just described and then store it in a clean zipper type plastic bag after drying. Cut small pieces as needed with a sterile razor or sterile clean scissors. Make sure your cutting blade does not have any rust on it. Rust residue on cut cactus tissue can ruin a graft. I recommend that the seedling have its first visible spines (the first ones look like feathers) before grafting. Otherwise the tissue will be too tender and not developed enough for good grafting success.

Here's how to use this method: First tightly roll the end of the masking tape so it is sticky all around on the end. Then pull off a strip long enough for your grafting needs. Push the rolled sticky end of the tape onto a clean counter area and pull your fingers off the other end. This will leave you with a straight piece of tape (sticky side up) on the counter.

Next you need to cut a 1/2 to 3/4 inch thick piece of foam which is the same size diameter of the stock (or cut just slightly larger). However, if the diameter of the stock plant is smaller than 3/4 inch, you should cut a thinner piece of sterile foam which is the same diameter of the stock plant. You only need to keep one side of the foam absolutely sterile. That is the surface that will touch the cut cactus. You can still handle it with your fingers on all the other surfaces.

Center the piece of foam on the prepared strip of masking tape so the sterile side is facing up. Attach it to the tape by pressing on the outside edges of the foam, but do not touch the surface of the foam which is facing up. Then make your cuts on the stock and scion. Position the scion on the stock in the correct location and press down slightly to remove any air underneath. Then lift the strip of tape with foam and center the foam over the diameter of the stock. Then practice moving the strip exactly up and down a few times without touching the scion. This will help you understand the correct motion for pressing it onto the scion/stock without any sideways shifting.

Once you have the motion correct, move the strip with the foam onto the scion and stock in one uniform fast motion until the foam starts to compress quite a bit. This is the tricky part and you may wish to practice a few times before grafting your nicer plants. Then while keeping the foam compressed on the stock (do not lift it or shift it), carefully attach each side of the tape to the pot. This is easier if your fingers are located in the correct spot on the strip of tape before you begin the process. That is why it is important to visualize where your fingers need to be ahead of time and practice with a cheaper plant initially. The pressure upon the foam padding will keep the scion in place when the tape is fastened to the sides of the pot. Make sure the sides of the pot are clean and the tape is securely attached. Avoid shifting the scion when you position the taped foam in place.

When using the masking tape with foam as the only method of attachment, your grafting stock must be very secure in the pot and not easily wobble in order to prevent the graft from shifting. Otherwise, with a wobbly stock you should use painter's "safe release" type masking tape and attach the tape directly to the stock. Make sure enough tape contacts the stock plant to keep the tape from coming off the plant. If possible, attach a second strip of masking tape criss crossing the first strip if additional downward tension is desired. The second strip of plain masking tape also helps to create more uniform downward tension upon the piece of foam. The other way to make sure the painter's type masking tape does not come unstuck (until you want it to) is to slightly stretch a rubber band around the diameter of the stock plant over the taped area and then "pinch" the rubber band together using an alligator clamp to hold that position. This should create enough pressure upon the tape to keep it from coming unstuck until you are ready to remove it.

Advanced Variations: One variation is to use clean open cell type window foam as your foam padding plus masking tape. This method is illustrated on the Israeli Cactus and Succulent Society web site. You can also custom cut the center of the foam/tape area for grafting scions with longer tubercles (that might otherwise tilt the scion when the foam is press down upon it). For this you should start with a thin thickness of foam only about 1/4 inch thick. Then cut a wedge on both sides of the central tape/foam area like this >< for applications that require a more narrow point of contact. I recommend that you strengthen the masking tape to make it stronger when custom cutting very thin or narrow areas into the center padded section. To reinforce the center area of the masking tape before cutting, attach a piece of same size width strapping tape on top of the masking tape just over the area that you are going to custom cut. I strongly recommend very clean sharp detail type scissors for this type of tape modification. The thin custom cut area will not accidentally break or twist if you take this extra precaution using the strapping tape over the center area of the masking tape before cutting. Since the foam is only 1/4 inch thick, this is used mainly to accurately position the scion on the stock, centering the narrow section of the tape/foam between the longer tubercle sections of the scion to help it attach without tilting the scion. Then you can use another similar type of cut foam/tape to go over this, criss crossing the first strip. Just make sure the downward pressure upon the tubercles doesn't tilt the scion off the surface of the stock.

Warning: If your foam padding is not the open cell type of foam and breathable, you may have a problem with tissue rot. Only use open cell (breathable) type foam that does not have a sealed or smooth surfaced area.

Warning about Stuck Spines: When using the foam with masking tape attachment method you can sometimes have spines that stick to the foam. This is usually not a problem with softer type spines, but mainly a problem with hooked spines or longer hard spines. One way to prevent longer spines from sticking to the foam is to cut the longer size spines with cuticle scissors (wear protective eye goggles if you do this). If you do end up with spines on the scion that hook or grip the foam, then remove as much of the tape and foam that you can and leave the remaining foam/tape attached for 2 more weeks before attempting to remove from the stuck spines. That way the scions pieces will be more firmly bonded to the stock and the stuck foam can be more safely removed.

Grafting Multiple Scion Pieces (also see micro grafting)
I recommend you review the staging area details in the micro grafting section before starting. I usually graft 3 tiny same size scions at a time this way, which are spaced equally apart upon the large diameter vascular ring tissue. Make sure the profile of the scions are just slightly wider than tall and rest upon the cut stock in a 90 degree perpendicular manner. Use the above masking tape and foam method for attaching. The foam should be cut square, using the same size as the diameter of the stock plant. The thickness of the foam should be at least 1/2 to 3/4 inch thick.

Although this method can be a bit tricky, it is a great way to graft 3 scions at the same time onto a larger size stock. Once the scions begin grow and eventually touch each other they will start to deform slightly and slow down their rate of growth just slightly. At this point you can re-graft them them onto individual stock plants or try to root them as a cutting to grow on their own roots.

Attaching the Scion on a Short Stock
When grafting onto a short stock, it is sometimes difficult to achieve proper downward tension or may not be practical to bevel cut the stock due to its size. This problem is easily solved by using the foam on masking tape method. Just make sure that none of the compressed foam material comes into contact with the soil or it may transmit contaminants to the cut cactus tissues. Remember to house your grafted cactus in an enclosed translucent plastic storage container for the first 10 days after grafting (to control the humidity) and remove the attachments 3 days after grafting.

Growing Environment for New Grafts

It is well worth the money to go and buy a large deep plastic storage container with a transparent or translucent lid (not colored) to house the larger size grafted plants during the first 10 days after grafting Try to find one with a flat bottom on the inside of the container. Keep the grafted plants close to room temperature or slightly warmer (check the temperature inside the container) and out of direct sunlight. The grafts will be shielded from air blown dust, fungus spores, bugs, drying wind or other conditions unfavorable to new grafts.

Enclose smaller size grafted cactus inside a zipper closure type plastic bag, opening for a few hours if the humidity get too high. Do not allow any moisture to accumulate on the cut grafted areas. About 10 days after grafting remove the plants from the protective humidity environment. Slowly acclimate the graft to increasing amounts of sunlight.

On the 3rd day (72 hours) after grafting, carefully remove the attachment material or whatever you used to hold the scion in place. Monitor the progress of the graft and if any tissue discoloration appears on the cut surface of the stock plant, immediately remove the plant from the enclosed container into dry open air. If there is strong discoloration on any of the cut tissues or it appears that rot is obvious, then refer to the next section.

Tissue Rot or Strong Discoloration
If surface rot of the stock or scion occurs, immediately re-cut the scion and stock with a sterile blade. Discard the infected tissue and re-attach the scion to the stock. A slight discoloration of the exposed cut tissues is usually not a problem unless the humidity is excessively high. If necessary, reduce the humidity level inside the enclosed container (or move the graft into a open space with free flowing air).

Watering Details

Watering
Cacti to be grafted, degrafted or rooted should be moderately watered 5 days prior to the operation with only plain water (no fertilizer water). If your stock does not bleed enough juice upon cutting, then water the stock just slightly immediately after grafting (plain water only - water sparingly from the bottom only). The stock plant should only be watered around the base (not overhead) until all cut tissues have calloused. This will help to prevent fungus or tissue rot from occurring.

If you water your grafting stock and then try to graft before waiting 5 days, the juices from the stock may be too watery. Gooey type juices are more desirable and also keep the cut tissues from dehydrated too quickly after grafting. Ideally, the stock should be watered and then the best time to graft would be when the soil is only moderately to just slightly moist.

Cactus Cuttings
Recommended Cutting Medium - (Revised December 19, 2003)
Simple Soil Mix - (Also use for Rooting Cuttings)
1/8 cup (= 2 tablespoons) of greensand
1/4 cup ground oyster shells (coarse crushed shells should be ground before measuring)
1 cup of finely screened peat moss (compress slightly when measuring) *
Mix the above dry items together and add 1 cup of boiling water. Mix well and allow to sit overnight covered with plastic. Then add the remaining items below.
1 cup horticultural grade vermiculite
1 cup river sand (Do not use ocean beach sand!)
3 cups of screened crushed rock (or #3 size chicken grit rock gravel)
9 cups perlite or screened pumice
Combine all the above ingredients in the order that they are listed, stirring well.
Use a weak 1/2 working strength liquid fertilizer to wet the medium as needed for mixing.
Remember to sterilize soil for rooting cuttings or starting seeds.

* Screen your dry peat moss through a fine size stainless steel screen type vegetable strainer, which will yield a very fine textured peat moss. Sometimes you can buy this type of fine textured peat moss already bagged in smaller sizes for starting seeds. When you measure out your 1 cup of dry peat moss, compress it just slightly in the measuring container. It is important to screen out all of the larger fragments of peat moss in order to prevent root rot of sensitive species.

Warning! Do not use builder's or construction type sand because it is often very high in dolomite and can stunt the growth of many types of plants. It is best to slightly moisten your bag of perlite and vermiculite by adding some water to the plastic bag and then resealing it. After it sits a few days in the bag, it will be safer to use and less airborne while mixing. Dust from dry ingredients can be hazardous to your lungs.

Transplanting into Deeper Pots
Most plants will prefer to have a bit more open textured soil when growing in pots larger than 2 inches. Therefore, when transplanting into larger size pots be sure to add additional perlite, pumice and/or gravel to the soil mix for better drainage, depending on the type of plants.

Making the Cut
Unless your plant is grown indoors under a clean environment or if you cut only a very tiny amount of connective stem tissue, you may wish to sterilize the surface of the cactus near the area of detachment. Lightly mist spray the areas to be cut with 50% isopropyl alcohol. Allow the cactus to dry a few hours before making the cut, but quickly blot off the excess alcohol on sensitive plants using a clean paper tissue. If you have heavy amounts of spines near the connective stem tissue, you may have to use a heavier mist spray to reach all the necessary surface areas. Use a sterile sharp blade for cutting which has been wiped with an alcohol damp white unscented tissue. Allow several seconds for any residual alcohol to evaporate off the blade before cutting.

Healing and Planting the Cutting
I use a large clean plastic housing container with a snap on lid for holding the cutting while it heals. Place a paper plate on a glass platter. Lay your cutting on the clean paper plate surface. Then seal the lid on the plastic container. Leave the cutting in this container for 2 to 4 weeks allowing the cut surfaces to become calloused. Open the container during this period about once a week, allowing fresh air to enter the container for several seconds before resealing it. After 2 to 4 weeks, you can plant the cutting in damp sterilized cutting medium and grow under brighter illumination. However, do not expose the rooted cutting to full sunlight or fertilizer water until new growth appears.

Removal of a Grafted Scion: Cut off the scion just above the connecting point. Make sure none of the original stock tissue is on the cut surface of the scion, or make another thin slice to remove the old stock tissue.
from http://sphosting.com/cactus/grafting_tips.html
Top of pageBottom of pageLink to this message

Sweetness (Sweetness)
Moderator
Username: Sweetness

Post Number: 662
Registered: 08-2003
Posted on Wednesday, January 07, 2004 - 02:10 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Nice call
*And without a thought of the consequence
I gave in to my decadence* Pink Floyd
Top of pageBottom of pageLink to this message

Hippie3 (Admin)
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 10391
Registered: 02-2001
Posted on Wednesday, January 07, 2004 - 02:22 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

image/bmpUpload
1.bmp (731.3 k)

image/bmpUpload
2.bmp (159.3 k)

Upload

archive material


(Message edited by admin on January 25, 2004)
Top of pageBottom of pageLink to this message

harry m stevens (Rockawayrooms)
Senior Member
Username: Rockawayrooms

Post Number: 317
Registered: 08-2003
Posted on Wednesday, January 07, 2004 - 03:22 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

1st grafting soon, thx hip you are da man!!
standing on a hill in a mountain
of dreams,telling myself it"s not as hard,hard as it seems;)l.zeppelin
Top of pageBottom of pageLink to this message

Feather Sea (Excrementmunkay)
Member
Username: Excrementmunkay

Post Number: 24
Registered: 12-2003
Posted on Sunday, January 25, 2004 - 01:00 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

can i go to one of our sponsors and find a peyote button to graft to my san pedro ? or as i now have noticed can i get any other species from them as well..

(Message edited by excrementmunkay on January 25, 2004)
(| x_____@|D ~
Top of pageBottom of pageLink to this message

Hippie3 (Admin)
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 11631
Registered: 02-2001
Posted on Sunday, January 25, 2004 - 01:23 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

depends on the sponsor's location,
peyote is illegal in the USA.
Top of pageBottom of pageLink to this message

Voodoo (Voodoo)
Senior Member
Username: Voodoo

Post Number: 218
Registered: 07-2003
Posted on Monday, January 26, 2004 - 11:30 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

http://happy-nature.com/eng/SiteTree/sitemap.html


If none of the board sponsers have them, I HIGHLY recommend this vendor.
Top of pageBottom of pageLink to this message

banjojo (Banjojo)
Senior Member
Username: Banjojo

Post Number: 542
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Tuesday, January 27, 2004 - 07:03 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Isn't Peyote also protected as an endangered species?
there's a fungus among us!

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Bold text Italics Underline Create a hyperlink Insert a clipart image

Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action: